generiko
GENERIKO
generiko
Sep 16 2015
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I’d say there’s a big difference between an opposition to a specific TW policy (or even the concept of a TW policy) and being opposed to the concept. I’m a staunch believer in academic freedom and of the sanctity of the classroom, and I definitely agree that placing a policy (especially one that carries the teeth of Read more

Sep 15 2015
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What reductionist terms would those be again? Not quite sure I follow what you’re saying

Sep 15 2015
2

Anyone who opposes TWs either doesn’t understand them or is a callous bastard

Sep 15 2015
3

This is pretty definitive proof you have no understanding of trigger warnings and their use. Read more

Sep 15 2015
9

Um, generally speaking, university students are already free to opt out of discussions, trigger warnings or not. Maybe at Kim Il Sung U or Idi Amin State you don’t have that option, but at every college I know of, the professors don’t deadbolt the doors and hold you until class is up. Read more

Sep 15 2015
10

I don’t think you have a firm grasp of how TW work. It’s not a ban on a subject matter. It’s just an alert that a topic is going to come up. You know, like a syllabus. It doesn’t do anything to hinder a conversation. It just tells what the topic of conversation is going to be ahead of time.

Sep 15 2015
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A TW is just a warning that a topic is coming. How does that ‘severley limit people’s ability to transmit ideas?’ They don’t prevent a topic from being discussed, debated or introduced. It’s just a head’s up. If there’s a conversation that someone does not want to be a part of, they can get up and leave without a Read more

Sep 15 2015
9

There’s a bit of a difference between ‘Hey, head’s up: this novel contains a depiction of rape which some of you might troubling’ and ‘Hey, fuck you, I don’t think you should be allowed to speak on this campus because I have a quibble with your politics.’ Read more

Sep 2 2015
1

It’s really no one’s place to try to take control of her own narrative. That’s a terrible thing to do to a person who has suffered trauma. We may not like or agree with it, but nobody needs to be taking that power away from her.

Sep 2 2015
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What? Truman was a Baptist who called America a Christian nation, Eisenhower was raised Jehova’s Witness but switched to Presby, Kennedy was a Catholic, Johnson thought he was God, Nixon knew he was God, Ford was Episcopalian, Carter has left the SBC but is very, very religious, and, I don’t know if you remember, but Read more

Sep 2 2015
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How is that different from America under pretty much every President?

Sep 2 2015
1

It’s worked in both Colombia and N. Ireland

Aug 27 2015
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I really wish you weren’t 100% right about that

Aug 25 2015
1

It’s comic books, but live-action instead of animated.

Aug 19 2015
11

The acceptance rate is less than a quarter of a percent. The funny thing about rates is that they’re independent of total population. Read more

Aug 19 2015
12

Yeah... they have one of the lowest rates of accepting refugees in the developed world. They’re hardly being overrun.

Aug 17 2015
2

Corporate accounts, bots and PR interns? Assuming there’s a difference between the 3

Jul 28 2015
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No, that’s not what I’m claiming. I’m saying that the video edits/glitches couldn’t be covering up anything too sinister given the context and their duration. While they are certainly odd, if you watch the whole video it’s nearly impossible to invent a plausible scenario in which something nefarious was captured on Read more

Jul 27 2015
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This doesn’t make any sense. What do other people being able to hear her death or what areas of the jail fall in view of the cameras have to do with the call to arrange bail that she made? It has nothing to do with police recordings of anything, that’s why I thought it might be convincing to you. Since it’s entirely Read more