albo
albo
albo
Jan 21
20

But here’s a question: did Jews actually like Crisco, or were they just victims of the dark art of advertising? Because I have tasted many of those heirloom Crisco recipes and they are... not good. Read more

Jan 20
4

Same. Mom always made sure there was at least one thing we liked on the table so we weren’t totally starving at bed time if we were being picky.
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Jan 20
8

Seems kinda weird that we would even call out someone that will only eat chicken nuggets and macaroni—and they rarely talk about it--when we have millions of people that are vegan and gluten free and make sure you know that within 30 seconds of meeting them.

Jan 20
5

This is why I favor the “You need to at least try it” approach with kids and food. A kid shouldn’t be forced to eat an entire serving of something they don’t like, but part of a parent’s job is exposing them to new things. Making them try a taste of everything at mealtime - even if they have tried it before - builds Read more

Jan 20
7

My parents were the same. They also added new/unfamiliar food along with familiar items. While they told us whatever at the table was the only thing available, we’re weren’t forced to try the new items. They just let us take our time to get familiar with it. I think this helped us expand our palates and be open to new Read more

Jan 20
12

I’m a picky eater though I’ve been attempting to change it as part of my new years resolutions (trying Hello Fresh to broaden my pallette and so far it seems to be working, tried Chicken Tikka Marsala last night and really enjoyed it, veggies and all.) but it can show up out of weird places. for me it’s usually Read more

Jan 20
15

“Seriously, dude?” Ally asked after watching Brad eat buttered noodles off a paper plate for the fourth night in a row. She’s slowly expanded his culinary horizons since then, helping him realize the foods he “didn’t like” were based on opinions he’d formed as a 7-year-old. “Just try it,” became her mantra, and more Read more

Jan 20
3

Picky eaters just need to learn to cook things for themselves. Once you quarter a chicken all on your own, you no longer get surprised when you see bones and cartilage that are in the same place on every damn chicken. Read more

Jan 20
3

My husband is a little picky, but not as bad as he used to be. For instance, I’ve introduced him to a number of cuisines he’d never tried before (Indian! Teppanyaki!) and he eats a few more vegetables now, though still not many. Read more

Jan 20
16

Parents definitely play a role. I was a picky eater as a kid, but eventually learned the lesson that whatever Mom made for dinner was what was available and no amount of bitching about it was going to get her to make something else. I either ate what she cooked or I went hungry. My Mom is a great home cook, it’s not Read more

Jan 15
3

I’ve got some PB and it’s good stuff. For tough rust though, I reach for Wurth Rost-Off. Unfortunately it costs more than most of David Tracy’s vehicles.

Jan 14
25

Both of my parents were born before/during the war so they grew up during the hard times. My mom is also a retired nurse, and she REALLY hates junk food, so it’s more in line with her personal preferences than her direct connection to her childhood. That conversation we had -- you practically could hear her eye roll.

Jan 14
25

Your mother probably never made it for you since it brings up painful memories for her. It’s not just a stew made up of US Rations that were given to Koreans during the war, it is made up of items that they would find in the TRASH. Younger kids will say, “Koreans were Freegans?!?! Awesome!” Um, no. They did this Read more

Jan 13
22

I remember watching an interview a few years back where Emma Stone talked about actually hating the name Emma, but because some bit player from 70 years ago already claimed the only “Emily Stone” SAG card available (they don’t allow repeats!) she had to adopt a pseudonym to work in Hollywood. That’s always been really Read more