InfectiousGirl
InfectiousGirl
6/9/14
8:23 PM
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Holy crap! That is a lot for MRSA. Usually its only resistant to a few, 3-4 at most maybe. Do you by any chance remember what they found that worked? I'm so glad something did!

6/9/14
8:21 PM
1

Depends on the infection. But generally speaking yes. Once everyone has had the same strain of a cold they should have immunity. There are tons and tons of strains of "cold" viruses so really it may not be the same on going around a household. The same thing applies to the flu. If everyone gets the same type of H1NI

6/9/14
8:17 PM
1

Depends what type. In general though its a nasty little virus that can get deeply ingrained into the hosts cells. It can go into dormant stages in certain types of nerve cells and your body basically forgets its there until it starts replicating. Also, like a lot of viruses treatment is just very difficult. Antivirals

6/9/14
8:12 PM
1

Not unless you are pregnant and drop it in the liter box! Haha. Not really no. Potential is a little higher but still not a huge worry.

6/9/14
8:11 PM
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I don't know of anything specific off the top of my head but I would be happy to look into it a little and get back to you. It is a very interesting topic.

6/9/14
8:08 PM
2

MRSA originally stood for methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus. Now it more commonly used to mean multidrug resistant staph aureus. Methiccilin is an antibiotic. Staphylococcus aureus is a common bacteria that is found all over people's bodies and the environment. So MRSA is a form of staph bacteria that is

6/9/14
7:53 PM
1

Nope! Sorry. From everything I understand and have read there isn't any evidence that vitamin C does anything. Thats not to say that staying healthy and eating well won't help but it doesn't seem to do anything specific

6/9/14
7:48 PM
1

There are a ton of potential reasons for varying levels of resistance and immunology is not an area I am super comfortable in. It can have to do with the blood flow to certain areas (no blood = no immune cells), number of immune cells, your body's ability to develop a strong immune reaction.

6/9/14
7:45 PM
2

multidrug resistant TB isn't much of a worry right now in the US and Canada. While its still a concern because of international travel its pretty unlikely. Regular TB on the other hand is a total possibility if you are around certain areas and groups of people. It is a pretty treatable illness though.

6/9/14
7:32 PM
3

5 second rule is bullshit. lol. as soon as it touches the ground bacteria can get on it. Honestly though I don't worry about it too much. Most bacteria on the floor won't bother you all that much.

6/9/14
7:30 PM
3

Good question. Really the major one is Ebola but not how it is in its current form. Right now Ebola is self limiting becuase it takes close contact with an infected person to get sick (and you'll know and want to stay far away). The scary potential is if Ebola mutates to become airborne, this is not a completely

6/9/14
7:25 PM
2

You're probably out of luck. You will be better of then those of us that have had no exposure if it comes back but most experts believe the immunity will only last for about 30 years. That means even people who got the vaccine at the tail end of the campaign have reached that mark

6/9/14
7:23 PM
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There are a lot of potentials on that list. Lieshmaniasis can pop up years after being infected. Chickungunya can cause a mild illness at first and lead to serious heart issues down the road. Anything parasitic can take a long long time to show symptoms. If I think of anymore specific examples I'll come back to this!

6/9/14
7:21 PM
3

Cholera is an interesting one. Yeah, control now is limited to protecting water sources. As you know if you have read any thing on John Snow though it is a very effective method. In typical situations, even in poorer countries cholera is handled pretty well now that we know how simple the prevention is and how

6/9/14
7:16 PM
1

Allergens are not something I know a whole lot about. I do know that allergy testing is super common and both of my parents have had it done. Its done in a very safe, controlled environment and its only put onto the skin to limit serious reactions. I really wouldn't worry. He will be fine!

6/9/14
7:13 PM
2

That really really depends on what organism caused the cellulitis. Its usually caused by a staph or strep infection. Because of the increase in MRSA in recent years she was probably worried about that as a possibility. It also can spread quickly from the skin and become a systemic infection so prompt treatment is