joe_suff
Joseph Bennington-Castro
joe_suff
Jan 24 2014
1

The adult sloth moths don't lay their eggs in the sloths, they lay their eggs in the sloth droppings. This is because sloth moth larvae are coprophagous — they only eat feces, not dead skin. Adult moths likely get some of the nutrients from the algae on the sloth's fur, but also directly from skin secretions. Read more

Jan 8 2014
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Haha, yes, I suppose that would work. Though the conditioning will likely take quite a few tries to stick with foods we're already familiar with (and like), such as cookies. Hmm.

Dec 24 2013
5

No, I don't think that bees are making "conscious decisions" to police or lay rogue eggs. If you read the next couple of paragraphs, I mention how a) policing and transgression are genetically hard-wired and b) there's no evidence for bees being socially responsive or sneaky.

Nov 22 2013
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Pretty much. There are few different uses for UV vision, particularly foraging and mating. For example, birds can zero-in on foods, such as fruits, based on the UV light that's reflected. And because the wings of some birds also highly reflect UV light, they use their UV vision during mating displays.

Nov 5 2013
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Fair enough. For me, the eye-tracking experiments were particularly convincing. But I think if the researchers were able to show prominent activity in the visual cortex , the study would have been more robust. Maybe they'll do so in the future.

Nov 5 2013
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I disagree — I think it's unfair to say the article is misleading. Granted, you may misconstrue what's actually happening if you only read the headline of the article and that one two-sentence paragraph (which doesn't put "see" in quotation marks). But if you actually read through the article, it's not, particularly Read more

Nov 5 2013
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They actually did do experiments where the researchers waved their hands in front of the participants — the participants couldn't detect the motion. Near the end of the article: "In both the blindfold and eye-tracking experiments, the participants couldn't see the movement of another person's hand." Read more

Oct 17 2013
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I'm curious about whether our vocal turn-taking has changed over human history. I mean, were interruptions less common in our distant past?

Oct 17 2013
1

Ugh, dammit. I have a dyslexic issue with numbers — this happens more often than I like to admit. I read 1986 as 1896. Thanks for catching the mistake.