capebuffalo
Cape Buffalo
capebuffalo
Nov 17 2015
3

Agreed. I’m autistic, and not particularly “high-functioning” [I hate that terminology] depending on what you’re assessing. I’m all about making the world more accessible and encouraging compassion for me and people like me, but that’s not a goal that’s served by making us synonymous with shitty behaviour.

Nov 17 2015
1

I mentioned this in another comment, but to me it tastes exactly like bacon smells, which I love because real bacon always disappointed me by smelling better than it tasted. So for me it’s more bacony than bacon because it lives up to all the undelivered promises real bacon gave me, but YMMV. As far as naming, that’s Read more

Nov 17 2015
Save

When I still ate meat, I was always disappointed with bacon because I loved the smell but the taste never lived up to it. My experience with coconut bacon chips is the opposite—it smells a little weird, but tastes just like what real bacon smells like.

Nov 17 2015
Save

Those things are delicious. I’ve been making them since long before I went vegan. They are the shit.

Nov 17 2015
1

Not gonna lie, the stuff’s actually pretty good. One of my local markets sells, like, chips of it in bags, and it makes a pretty good snack, though I’ve never tried cooking with it.

Nov 17 2015
Save

YEP. I don’t know why there’s such a high overlap between veganism and fad diets and pseudoscience bullshit, though I think it’s at least partly because a lot of people confuse veganism as a diet instead of an ethical framework and then drag us down into their bullshit by association, but it frustrates the hell out of Read more

Nov 17 2015
3

THIS KIND OF BULLSHIT IS WHY VEGANS HAVE SUCH A BAD NAME.

Well, it’s one reason, anyway. Especially where veganism overlaps with fad diets and pseudoscience and weird hippie occult shit. As a self-respecting, mostly sane, science-minded person who avoids animal products because of my personal ethics, this kind of Read more

Nov 17 2015
1

I know this feel, sorta. I have pierced nipples, which my cat is convinced are just pricey cat toys that I conveniently attached to my body for her, and tend to sleep in the buff, which has resulted in more than a few incidents of being rudely awakened by sharp little cat teeth and/or claws when she decides it’s play Read more

Nov 17 2015
1

We always have to choose between two equally unpleasant options—lock the cat out, at which point she cries loud enough to wake the dead at the indignity of not having access to every room of the house, or let her in, at which point she leaves us alone but throws a tantrum because we’re not paying attention to her, Read more

Nov 17 2015
2

It was so necessary! Everyone off schedule is literally bundled up in coats, hats, scarves, gloves, and blankets, even in the middle of summer.

Nov 17 2015
Save

Yeah this is mainly my fear. I don’t trust the wiring in my house AT ALL, though my anxiety surely has at least a bit to do with that. The crock pot isn’t the only thing I don’t want unsupervised; we turn off and unplug most everything when we’re not home.

Nov 17 2015
6

This happens to us all the time. I work in an old and poorly-wired building. I also work in a department of entirely women, in an office that designed its heating scheme for men and then dropped another 5 or so degrees off that. We’re all freezing all the time, and we all have personal space heaters, but we learned Read more

Nov 17 2015
1

I’m the same way honestly. I can leave something like a crockpot alone for maybe a couple of hours, but beyond that my anxiety kicks in and I’ll just panic until I can check on it. Mine gets a lot of use on weekends and days off, but not so much on work days.

Nov 17 2015
2

Heeeey synesthesia friend! I have ordinal-linguistic personification —for laymen, that means that certain ordered sequences have personalities, which can also extend to objects that I associate with those sequences. For example, the number 4 is a cheerful and upbeat number, and I’ll sometimes assign a cheerful and Read more

Nov 17 2015
Save

Two things—one, we tend to underestimate how much of what goes on our hands also goes in our mouth, or nose, or eyes, or other place where it can be absorbed into our bodies and there cause a reaction. Pay attention to how many times you touch your face in, say, an hour.

Two, yes, even an infinitesimally small amount Read more

Nov 17 2015
Save

I’m fine if restaurants don’t want to cater to allergy sufferers, but if they’re going to do that they need to be up-front about it and not half-ass it. If you can’t offer products free from cross-contamination, don’t advertise as though you can. Simple as that.

Nov 11 2015
Save

Tipping as a system already doesn’t make logical sense, so there’s certainly no reason the sub-rules therein should. For so long as hard-working people’s livelihoods are in our hands thanks to an archaic and senseless system, “whichever is greater” is an AWESOME rule of thumb to keep in mind in situations where the Read more

Nov 11 2015
1

*facepalm* You’re right. I thought I had replied to you with that earlier comment, but evidently I did not.

Nov 11 2015
Save

During my tenure as a server at a relatively nice local Chinese restaurant outside of Boulder, CO, I learned a hard truth about serving families with children: not all parents think they need to tip on their children’s meals. “Wait, this is a thing?” you ask. Yes, it’s a thing. A thing that I learned the hard way, Read more