Gene
anpanman9999
11/13/15
5:51 PM
1

I guess we’re just arguing semantics now. You’re right that the term is usually used to refer to radiological bombs with conventional explosives, I was using it more generically as a “bomb that’s designed to be dirty.” But whatever. I agree this purported device would be a nuclear explosive.

11/13/15
5:44 PM
2

Life expectancy was hugely influenced by a high infant mortality rate. If you survived into adulthood, you could expect to live much longer. And while certainly less people lived into what we would consider “old age,” a fair number still did.

11/13/15
5:09 PM
3

Wow, that’s really not much food at all! Are you perhaps half plant? Photosynthetic skin? :)

11/13/15
4:47 PM
2

Really? I cycled the length of Japan a few years ago, and I’m pretty sure I ate more. Or at least, I ate more caloricly dense foods. Did your weight change much if at all? (Mind didn’t.)

11/13/15
4:44 PM
1

That would make sense. There’s some question as to why people live that long at all (since even “less food” is still more than “no food”) and the prevailing theory seems to be that the knowledge and experience they can provide gives their progeny a competitive advantage. But you don’t need to eat much for that :)

11/13/15
4:39 PM
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It’s purportedly designed to produce as much radioactive fallout as it can (I mean, salted with cobalt, c’mon) as an area denial weapon. If that’s not a dirty bomb I don’t know what is. Sure, it can be a neutron bomb too, as with salting they can be very effective at producing radioactive fallout.

11/13/15
3:59 PM
3

Huh, interesting. I wonder if it they weren’t eating as much as they needed to, or that they couldn’t metabolize the extra food that they did eat. Or maybe a combination? Wasn’t clear from the abstract.

11/13/15
3:23 PM
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As far as I know you’re right, but we’re talking (well, at least I was) about the currently fastest object. Helios reached that speed at the nearest approach to the sun, but wouldn’t sustain it throughout it’s orbit. Given that it’s still in its highly eccentric orbit though, it should periodically take the “currently Read more

11/13/15
3:18 PM
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Nope. Your logic is all over the map.

11/13/15
3:11 PM
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Well the probe was to study the outer planets, nothing to do with contacting aliens. The golden record is honestly pretty silly, but I’d say it was for ourselves; to satisfy our sentimentality and symbolism.

11/13/15
3:09 PM
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Yeah, I know. I was being glib - actually sorry for that, I think you were being sincere and that was unwarranted. Read more

11/13/15
2:50 PM
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Well if that’s what they’re looking for, they certainly wouldn’t need Voyager to point their way to us; it would be far far easier to spot Earth itself using telescope over interplanetary distances than to spot Voyager hurtling through deep space.

11/13/15
2:49 PM
2

Good thing we’ve got a smallpox vaccine then.

11/13/15
2:44 PM
24

So smoking or auto accidents only effect one or few lives? Um...

11/13/15
2:40 PM
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Helios probes were traveling way faster. Not sure how fast they’re going now, but it’s not going to be anywhere near what they hit at aphelion. Looks like they’re still in the same orbit though, so they will hit similar speeds periodically, and looks like perihelion is still inside Mercury so orbital period can’t be Read more

11/13/15
2:36 PM
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How’s that? And note I said “in any meaningful manner”, which in the context of alien invasion that the post I was replying to was talking about, would mean a force capable of actually invading and winning, not just dropping a probe on our planet.

11/13/15
2:32 PM
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Uh, last I checked Voyager is nowhere near any alien civilizations. Unless... conspiracy!!!

11/13/15
1:13 PM
14

Pretty sure any alien civ capable of actually getting here in any meaningful manner would have no problem fabricating any of that from the resources that are readily available.

11/13/15
1:09 PM
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No doubt slowing down since it’s climbing the sun’s gravity well, but by how much is a good question.

11/13/15
12:45 PM
7

At current velocity and trajectory Voyager-1 will arrive at Proxima Centaur in 73,600 years
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