Emrielle
Emrielle
2/21/14
8:56 PM
11

Everyone's got the emotional stuff covered, so here's something random: If you accidentally write on a whiteboard with a permanent marker, go over it with a dry-erase marker and wipe it off. It takes the permanent marker with it.

2/20/14
11:44 AM
1

I used to loathe science fiction! (Lit and art history major here.) But about two years ago I started an "after hours" version of my book club where we only read science fiction to have a genre discussion and I love it so hard now. Oh sci-fi! I'm glad I discovered you.

2/19/14
8:34 PM
1

When I was three, I begged my mom to let me get my ears pierced. I remember begging her for days, and she finally said yes. We went to the beauty parlor and the lady did one ear. I cried so hard and said I couldn't do the other ear at that time, so I came back three days later for the second one. You were smart to Read more

2/19/14
8:12 PM
6

Ditto. Science fiction is never really a commentary on the future is a commentary on the present and is incredibly useful when studying an era from a historical perspective.

2/19/14
8:11 PM
10

Sci-Fi seems to bring out the lit snob in a lot of people. Sci-Fi covers so much interesting ground, pushes a lot of boundaries and can do it so well. It's a shame.

2/13/14
11:06 AM
1

Oh and FWIW, an attention-getting technique that works well for me is to loudly, slowly, ominously count down: "THREE!... TWO!... ONE!..." I accompany this with finger numbers raised high. By the time I get to one, they're all quiet and looking at me seriously. Then I give them a big smile and say what I need to say. Read more

2/13/14
6:38 AM
1

Thank you for writing this. I'm currently and English language assistant, and as ardently as I claim to be a feminist, your title totally made me realize how I don't use gender neutral terms to address my middle school students. When I was in HS, I had a jazz ensemble instructor who referred to us as "young people". I Read more

2/12/14
8:57 PM
1

One of my professors uses silly high language to address us as a group in class or emails. He'll call us MENA cohorts, MENA experts, stuff like that. You could just replace MENA with the subject you're teaching!

2/12/14
8:42 PM
1

I just remembered, I do this thing where I go, "Ready to Rock???" And they say, "Ready to Roll!!!" We go back and forth three times and then everyone has to be quiet. I tend to say "Ready to Rock?" like a crazy rockstar.

2/12/14
8:39 PM
3

I usually say, "Period two! Use your inside voices!!!" (this is my most common admonition). I also call them "My Little Monsters/ My Little (variables/ exponents/ polynomials/ radicals, etc)" I teach algebra. All October they were my little pumpkins. They often get upset because they are 8th graders and hence not Read more

2/12/14
8:38 PM
1

You can always just jump right into instruction with something along the lines of, "Okay, so here's what we are going to do today..." Or, if they are being very noisy, "May I have your attention, please?"

2/12/14
8:29 PM
1

A bit more formal, possibly for when you want to get serious- use the adjective related to the university/school name?
Such as: "Good morning, Oxonians."

2/12/14
8:18 PM
1

I say : people. Or : young people (jeunes gens, I teach in french). It works for me.

2/12/14
8:16 PM
1

It worked fine with me on kids that I knew. But as a temp group leader or someone that they weren't familiar with, I would be laughed out or ignored. Which is why I would tread lightly with that one.

2/12/14
8:12 PM
1

One of my professors at university used to address us as "Art Historians". I liked that.

2/12/14
8:05 PM
1

An excellent English teacher I had would address us as 'scholars!'. I always enjoyed it because he assumed that we wanted to learn, and that attitude really made a big difference with our attitudes.