Cyborg tackles unlikely superhero subjects of race and disability

French comics scribe Fabien Vehlmann continues his run of penning a slate of varied and interesting comics, highlighted by the quality of his artistic collaborators. In The Marquis Of Anaon: The Isle Of Brac, U.K. publishers Cinebook bring to English-language audiences the first book in Vehlmann and Matthieu…

Jim Gordon steps into Batman’s shoes and Grant Morrison’s Annihilator concludes

Jim Gordon as a mech-suit-wearing Batman officially sanctioned by the Gotham City Police Department is the kind of idea that probably started off as a joke in a development meeting. Gordon is the main character on a network TV series, so how can he have a bigger part in the Batman comics? Why not throw him in a suit…

Your patience will be rewarded with the atmospheric Arclight and surreal Stroppy

Fans of Kathryn and Stuart Immonen have been waiting quite some time for their next graphic novel collaboration: Moving Pictures came out almost five years ago and their other joint projects have been fairly short. Both Immonens have done work for Marvel during their time apart, Kathryn writing Runaways and the…

Two new Secret Wars tie-ins justify destroying the Marvel Universe

While Brenden Fletcher has proven his abilities on a slew of recent books, writing Batgirl with Cameron Stewart and Gotham Academy with Becky Cloonan, Black Canary #1 (DC) is his first full-length solo venture for DC. It’s easy to see why he’d get tapped for this project: Gotham Academy and Batgirl were both a big…

Weird Love celebrates the worst of the romantic comic genre—plus bear hijinks

DC You is the biggest shake up in the DC universe since the New 52, and just a few weeks in the landscape looks remarkably different. John Constantine is openly flirting with men, Section 8 is back in business, and Koriand’r has gone off on her own, leaving Jason and Roy to carry on without her. Starfire #1 (DC) has a…

Drawn & Quarterly celebrates 25 years with some of the boldest voices in comics

In the 25 years since its creation, Drawn & Quarterly has grown from a small comics magazine into one of the industry’s top publishers, crafting impeccably designed titles by renowned cartoonists like Lynda Barry, Chester Brown, and Seth, along with works by some of the most exciting, provocative new talents in…

SuperMutant Magic Academy’s mundane magic offers a fresh take on Harry Potter

It is difficult to come up with fresh praise for Jillian Tamaki’s SuperMutant Magic Academy (Drawn & Quarterly). It is one of those widely acclaimed and reviewed works that makes you question what gushing praise or astute observation there is left to bestow upon it that hasn’t already been noted. Originally serialized…

Lovers Only and Cash & Carrie tell quality teen stories; Dave Sim’s Cerebus returns

A somewhat surprise release from publishers Youth In Decline last month, Lovers Only sees three of comics’ most interesting, contemporary cartoonists—Cathy G. Johnson, Mickey Zacchilli, and Sophia Foster-Dimino—come together to produce a sweet and awkward anthology of teen romance comics.

The Divine creators on dragons, deities, and child soldiers (plus an exclusive preview)

The mists of intrigue surround the story of Johnny Htoo and Luther Htoo, twin brothers who, at the age of 12, jointly led the God’s Army guerrilla group in Burma during the late 1990s. As the tale goes, it was in March 1997 when a local pastor brought the two illiterate 9-year-olds—real names Bu Lu and Bu Kyaw—to the…

The magic is back in Jem, while lameness shines in Regrettable Superheroes

Released in its native French in four volume installments over the course of 2009 to 2014, Laura Zuccheri and Sylviane Corgiat’s The Swords Of Glass (Humanoids) has the hallmarks of a contemporary classic. Too often, European fantasy set in “times long ago” relies on lazy clichés and stereotypes as crutches which prop…

Wonder Woman ’77’s strong art doesn’t make up for under-representing women

After an undefined apocalyptic event leaves an eerily human-free world and the Earth scorched and ruined, Simon, a tame dog, finally decides to leave his home and kennel to venture into the woods. His owners have been gone for a while and it doesn’t seem likely they’ll return. Some time on, Simon’s decided that he…

Shazam! goes old school, Avengers gets new blood, and No Mercy hits hard

This summer both of the big two publishers are taking the opportunity to throw spaghetti at the wall and figure out what sticks and what they might be able to use in primary continuity. That’s the joy of having multiple universes collide all at once: They can rely on ideas old and new to attract readers and make…

Rage Of Ultron baffles those without in-depth Avengers knowledge

Kris Mukai’s latest sees the versatile cartoonist veer into yet another direction after the grimy humor of Commuter and foraging adventure of Bibi The Witch. As the title suggests, Weeping Flower, Grows In Darkness is decidedly more ominous in tone: Young friends Eleanor and Antony wander alone in the woods among a…

Kenya and Pride set a slow burn, while Miami Vice Remix gets to the ’80s action

The allure of Rodolphe and Léo’s Kenya series is essentially twofold. Readers witness a smorgasbord of various genre elements—globe-trotting adventure, alien invasion tale, spy thriller (with added dinosaurs for taste)—mashed together to somehow produce a cogent, compelling tale. And they see Léo draw the…

Archie Vs. Predator and Kaijumax juggle tones, Tamaki’s Frontier astounds

Archie Andrews and his friends are no strangers to crossovers, meeting characters like the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the cast of Glee, the members of Kiss, and even The Punisher at different points in their extensive history. A Sharknado is coming to Riverdale this summer, but before that happens, an equally…

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