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History repeats: First as tragedy, then as farce, and finally as a rote biopic in The Young Karl Marx

Last year marked the 150th anniversary of the publication of the first volume of Karl Marx’s Capital: Critique Of Political Economy, which did for social science and political economy what Charles Darwin’s On The Origin Of Species had done for biology. Yet the formidable book took five years to sell 1,000 copies in…

Aphex Twin, Curve, and Jawbreaker had the best-kept secret hits of 1992

To commemorate 60 years of the Billboard Hot 100, Off The Charts revisits each year since it was established to spotlight songs and artists that didn’t make the cut, yet still made a significant impact. Years are chosen randomly and—to make it even harder on ourselves—rules for inclusion are that neither the songs nor

Doing it wrong: 11+ deeply unsexy sex scenes

What’s that old saying about sex being like pizza? Even when it’s bad, it’s still good? There’s no such saying about bad sex scenes. It’s not uncommon for the movies to get sex wrong—to reduce it to a gauzily lit pantomime of pleasure, actors striking “passionate” poses beneath carefully positioned sheets, in some…

Clint Eastwood directing military men with no acting experience goes about as well as expected

A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky are kicking off a new season of Film Club by discussing Clint Eastwood’s The 15:17 To Paris, the latest film in the director’s recent streak of biographical thrillers, following Sully and American Sniper. Like those films, 15:17 explores real-life…

An experiment in stunt casting, The 15:17 To Paris is one of Clint Eastwood’s strangest films—and one of his worst

A failed experiment in stunt casting, Clint Eastwood’s The 15:17 To Paris recreates the thwarted 2015 Thalys terror attack—in which a gunman attempted to open fire on a French high-speed train, striking a man in the neck before being disarmed and subdued by a group that included two vacationing American…

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Netflix’s sci-fi surprise release The Cloverfield Paradox isn’t as original as its marketing gimmick

Like characters in one of those zombie movies where no one says “zombie,” the crew of the Cloverfield space station—a big metal psilocybin mushroom orbiting near-future Earth—doesn’t know what it’s in for, having left our planet without ever having seen a single sci-fi horror movie: not Alien, not Event Horizon, and…