Why the fatalistic Goodbye Yellow Brick Road remains Elton John’s most popular album

In We’re No. 1, Steven Hyden examines an album that went to No. 1 on the Billboard charts to get to the heart of what it means to be popular in pop music, and how that concept has changed over the years. In this installment, he covers Elton John’s Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, which went to No. 1 on November 10, 1973,

This Was Pop’s favorite radio singles of the year, Bieber and beyond

Every month in This Was Pop, Steven Hyden and Genevieve Koski skim the surface and plumb the depths of the Billboard charts to dredge up what’s good, bad, inescapable, and bubbling under in pop music. This year, pop radio was defined by a couple of out-of-nowhere success stories, Carly Rae Jepsen’s “Call Me Maybe” and…

Jimmy Buffett pulled in some country-music ringers for the horribly titled License To Chill 

In We’re No. 1, Steven Hyden examines an album that went to No. 1 on the Billboard charts to get to the heart of what it means to be popular in pop music, and how that concept has changed over the years. In this installment, he covers Jimmy Buffett’s License To Chill, which went to No. 1 on July 25, 2004, where it

The best music of 2012: The ballots

Our main list of the year’s best albums doesn’t just appear out of thin air. It’s tallied from ballots by a group of writers, each of whom is given 100 points to distribute over no more than 20 of their favorite records. The maximum number of points a writer can award an album is 15; the minimum is one. Below are the…

Tenacious D rocks WTF and Yvette Nicole Brown completes The J.V. Club’s Community trifecta

Hey, you like podcasts? Make sure you check out Reasonable Discussions, the A.V. Club podcast. Podmass comments can be directed to podmass@avclub.com.

Foo Fighters’ debut was a bridge between Nirvana and mid-’90s alt-rock 

Longtime readers of The A.V. Club might remember Permanent Records, a recurring feature that ran on the site in the late ’00s. Subtitled “Albums from The A.V. Club’s Hall Of Fame,” Permanent Records spotlighted music that was nearest and dearest to our hearts. Sometimes we talked about lost classics like Sloan’s Between

Advertisement