Nicole Dieker
nicoledieker
Nicole Dieker has been writing about personal finance for over six years. She's also the author of The Biographies of Ordinary People, a Millennial-era Little Women.
9/11/19
1:21 PM
39

For me, the biggest trick has been shifting my perspective. Perhaps it comes naturally with age (and the sense that you’re running out of track), but the realization that money is ultimately a finite resource — there is a specific amount that you will ever earn in your lifetime, and everything is drawn from that supply

9/4/19
1:34 PM
3

My first job out of college was sorting dirty hospital laundry at an industrial facility servicing several hospitals. Sounds gross, right? It was worse than it sounds. I won’t befoul the post with details.

8/28/19
2:55 PM
15

I just approach being a landlord the same why I do life - be respectful of everyone and treat them fairly until they give you a reason not to. To my tenants, the houses they are renting from me are their homes and I want them to feel like it’s THEIR home so they treat it well and want to stay for a long time. I

8/28/19
7:11 AM
1

This was a wonderful piece! As a trumpet player and a drummer, this really nails it on the head. One other important thing thing that wasn’t mentioned which I was always taught was to practice scales and rudiments every single day. If you can’t nail the fundamentals, you won’t be able to play Coltrane.

8/27/19
1:50 PM
3

Not directly in line with the suggestions in the article, but two similar phrases that my teacher used a lot:

8/27/19
1:29 PM
2

So, as a formerly somewhat-accomplished classical musician (I eventually walked away from the biz, because, as Det. Callahan says, “A man’s got to know his limitations.”), I heartily agree that it’s not just quantity, but quality of practice.

8/27/19
12:48 PM
2

This is probably because I started learning to play piano at such a young age with a teacher but this is how I’ve already practiced and never thought of doing it differently. Playing through an entire song from start to end is for show, not for learning.

8/26/19
1:25 PM
13

Well if the gift card is a gift YOU aren’t giving them the loan...

8/26/19
7:28 AM
1

Wealth, in fact, is what you don’t see. It’s the cars not purchased. The diamonds not bought... 

8/23/19
9:50 AM
6

Karl Marx had a similar idea, but he didn't think of it quite as fondly:

8/21/19
7:16 PM
1

Can you please make one of these for new college grads? Or those looking to start their first credit card? I just started my first corporate job and though these articles are relatable, they may not be applicable for now at this point in my career. I appreciate your time.

8/20/19
1:17 PM
6

Good points, Nicole - the focus on “differential progress” is good advice. I’ll add some that have served me well.

8/19/19
12:47 PM
5

The last sentence “if an employee goes into that type of evaluation without having a good idea of what’s going to be discussed, there’s been a feedback failure somewhere in the process—and it’s probably yours.”

8/15/19
1:05 PM
3

Another Behavioral Economist here - people make irrational choices all the time. Risk is inherent to Stocks, but the long term play is to let things settle themselves out. Staring at your portfolio will make you miserable. Too many commodities are being traded on sentiment and not for fundamental deficiencies. The

8/13/19
1:45 PM
1

If the idea of putting money into the market as rates fall makes you feel anxious, then just make sure you shift that towards just maxing out your retirement savings for the year NOW, as opposed to at tax time or incrementally over time. I mean, you should be doing it anyway, right?

8/12/19
2:51 PM
4

Or just keep your stuff in a single, consistent spot (per Marie Kondo etc.) and check it when you run out of something. We use labelled plastic shelving units of various sizes, along with plastic shoeboxes (example: one is dedicated to multivitamins and other supplements), and it makes things soooo simple.

8/9/19
2:22 PM
2

Room and board can differ greatly depending on the college, even in the same state. Just like housing rates differ depending on city. Getting a room in a major city versus a smaller school not in a major city is a big difference.

8/9/19
1:52 PM
2

I know I’m opening a can of worms here, but this is important as it relates to the presidential candidates and their college proposals. Free college is typically tuition and fees; it doesn’t include other things like room & board, which can be just as expensive even at state public universities.