Nicole Dieker
nicoledieker
Nicole Dieker has been writing about personal finance for over six years. She's also the author of The Biographies of Ordinary People, a Millennial-era Little Women.
1/15/20
2:12 PM
4

Such a great writeup. I often refer to analog clocks (or analog gauges in cars) as “living pie charts” because they engage our brains in entire different, more continuous ways (rather than discrete, overly empirical points in time/speed/temperature/revs, which themselves are continuous). Rates of change are important Read more

1/13/20
3:19 PM
8

I think this should include the contingency moments as well. You could be in the “I don’t care what it costs to eat a restaurant” category, but the moment an emergency comes up* and wipes you back down to “paycheck to paycheck” category, I don’t think it makes sense you were high up there to begin with. Read more

1/8/20
2:19 PM
2

I use IFTTT to capture and record my FitBit data automatically into a google sheets doc. Works like a charm! I’ve also set up my Eufy smartscale to do the same. It was all super easy to do.

1/3/20
12:52 PM
5

Jobwise. Been there doing that. Hired onto a 6 month contract position 9 months ago at a good-enough physical location at a reduced rate. Then they moved the job to a further away location which is too far as time and gas-cost-wise, but I need the income. Been looking for another job all along anyway, and nothing Read more

1/3/20
12:24 PM
1

In 2010 I was saving major amounts of cash, having started my first adult job in 08 and living incredibly cheaply. But it was in Utah and I hated living there and the job had an expiration date, so I moved that year to Massachusetts, taking a temporary pay cut to do it. Read more

1/2/20
1:40 PM
1

WoW! I didn’t expect to ever see this statement in print. It is what I have been saying for over 10 years now. I have done presentations to groups large and small talking about all of what is coming together to the ruin of human habitat and at the end I just wait for the inevitable question “so what can we do?”, and I Read more

1/2/20
9:30 AM
7

I think the side-benefit to doing this is noticing patterns in what you list/don’t list. Read more

12/20/19
3:07 PM
3

Thanks for the break down with real-world numbers. I’ve heard so many people speak so highly about these cards, and all my friends seem to break them out when we go out for dinner, but when you run the numbers like that, it makes them seem even less worth it than I thought. Basically, they’re only worth it for the Read more

12/17/19
4:52 AM
2

Not a gift, but as a teenager I was once sent to the store to buy a replacement for a can opener that had broken. Since that one had broken, instead of buying the exact same $1.99 can opener, I bought the $7 one. My mom’s mind was blown by how nice it was to use. She admitted she never would have spent the money on Read more

12/12/19
12:49 PM
4

Not me, but one of my closest friends (and former roommate, actually) had to deal with this. One of his roommates in his old apartment was in charge of utilities (it all came on one bill). For over a year, unbeknownst to everyone else in the house, they had been pocketing most of the money and paying only just enough Read more

12/12/19
12:43 PM
6

I had a roommate who told me that he didn’t need wifi and could use his phone or public wifi so he would no longer pay his part of the internet bill. Read more

12/9/19
12:52 PM
1

I do something similar. I got rid of the browser on my phone along with all social media apps and news apps. I kept my RSS reader. I figure it doles out a limited and curated selection of information, so it is not so bad to catch up with that without getting down any real rabbit holes. Read more

12/5/19
7:39 AM
1

I just take the total (including fee) and divide by the number of months until the APR expires and then make that the automatic monthly payment. Then I set it and forget it and it is guaranteed to be paid off by the time the APR expires.

12/5/19
6:17 AM
1

Growing up I was always told this was a bad thing to do. this is the credit card trap. But I guess its a sign of the times that all of us millennials are that seriously boned.

12/4/19
5:59 PM
1

A hack within a hack on this is that some cards allow free transfers that count pretty much as purchases (no miles tho) – it’s useful for buying yourself some extra time on a big purchase, perhaps moreso than paying down a large accumulated CC debt
I can get approx. 120 days credit free by transferring from my BoA Read more

12/4/19
4:26 PM
1

nYNAB’s goals are great for this. Set a target date goal on the card and it will auto-calculate your monthly payment, taking any additional spending on the card into account automatically.

11/21/19
1:21 PM
2

I love walking and I find myself taking longer and longer walks as my burnout progresses. I also love yard work and I really really really miss having a house where I can tinker in a garden or slash vines with a machete.

11/21/19
1:17 PM
6

For me, the time spent walking my dog in the a.m. (normally 50-60 minutes) while it is still dark is a good way to ease my brain into the day before it spools up and begins the churn. Read more