Meghan Moravcik Walbert
megwalbert
Lifehacker Parenting Editor
9/20/19
12:11 PM
5

Good advice. I would add “Look for someone in a uniform.” Store employees are usually trained to bring a lost kid to the Customer Service desk and have the parents paged. At the beach, my kids know to look for the nearest lifeguard stand.  Even the ride attendants at an amusement park are trained to deal with lost

9/19/19
3:09 PM
1

For apps, I normally recommend my clients use Talking Parents. It is free and can allow the judge access if it gets to that point. However, if you dont NEED an app, dont use it. It just says “I dont trust you” to the other parent which has lead to more confrontation.

9/19/19
2:40 PM
21

This is like one of the best (and increasingly rare and true proper) lifehacks I’ve seen on this site.

9/19/19
1:10 PM
3

Lessons learned from experience, your mileage may vary.

9/18/19
7:14 PM
1

This is really cool. I think online classrooms are a great way to get everyone similar tutoring I have tutored one-on-one and in small-groups and I really liked the interactions of the small groups.

9/18/19
4:41 PM
3

My kid isn’t old enough for this kind of thing yet, but it’s something that’s got to be a super fine line for sure. Yeah, this police officer is harassing you because you’re not the right kind of person he thinks should be in that particular place and he’s being a petty jerk... Does he deserve respect? No. But

and 1 more
9/18/19
3:50 PM
5

What is funny is that since it is a computer talking and she is repeating the request over and over it is literally in the exact same tone every time (it is not perfect, but it is not in a weird digitally sounding voice).

9/17/19
12:38 PM
5

That’s one of the many responses you might go with. This book talks about at great length naming your child’s emotions as a way to teach them about emotional intelligence. You could have just as easily said “wow, you seem incredibly frustrated”, another invitation to talk about it further. And sometimes you’ll get

9/17/19
9:57 AM
5

Has someone just asking “why are you so sad?” ever actually helped you as an adult do that? Or, as I think more likely, has it been more valuable for a supportive person to say “tell me what happened” and let you talk and parse it out? The article isn’t advocating for ignoring naming emotions. It’s advocating talking

9/17/19
4:43 AM
7

It seems that some people are still missing the point... The article does not question that kids need to develop their emotional intelligence, it questions that asking ‘why’ is the effective method of doing that.

Asking ‘why’ is more about you than about the child - it is just interrogation, expression of your demand

9/16/19
8:01 PM
6

Yeah, when I read this I thought “This seems 100% applicable to my adult relationships, I’m glad I clicked through even though I don’t have kids”

9/16/19
4:27 PM
11

This is a way to improve emotional intelligence. Identifying/naming specific emotions as they happen is necessary before any deeper examination of causes or ways to move forward. Reflecting on emotions and sitting with them is an important step forward. Jumping too far ahead in the process can be frustrating and

9/16/19
3:21 PM
1

My parents had a negative association with my daughter’s name (my half-brother’s [now ex-]wife). Two years later they couldn’t care less. It feels like such a high stakes decision when parenting but as the article says after 2-5 years all of these feelings of the name being SO IMPORTANT kind of fall away and you just

9/16/19
2:14 PM
1

My husband and I picked out names we liked a year before we even got married (35 years ago). We were on the phone and I read names to him I liked and he only wrote down ones he liked. Our first choice for a girl was Rachel Marie. We didn’t tell ANYONE. Three weeks later, my uncle called and said my aunt had her baby.
“C

9/16/19
12:13 PM
3

I think it’s only a big deal if you’re close family, like close to the point where you interact with them on a weekly basis. I’ve got a bunch of cousins, but we rarely see each other. There are a couple of identical kids names among the group (Jacob and Caroline), and it’s not a big deal. But my brother-in-law’s

9/16/19
10:52 AM
4

We had this. We told everyone what name we had planned to name our second. Friends had separately picked the same name before us, but hadn’t told anyone. Their kid came first and they announced their name. We ended up keeping our name pick in that case. Our kid remember to his name friend as “Other Me”.

9/13/19
3:01 PM
6

That, or security checks will need to change.  These kids will be the first generation where their parents were fully online.  Figuring out someone’s mother’s maiden name will be trivial, for example, even without “sharenting”.  Home towns and other info will be pretty easy to see too.  I think we need to acknowledge

9/12/19
2:25 PM
4

That’s why they say to revisit those rules as the children grow up. But the bottom line is that a 5 year old has no business touching other people’s private parts or letting other people touch his/hers. It’s fine to set that as a rule at that point. You can always add that rules will change as they grow up and become