kitliz
Kit Stansley
kitliz
Sep 29 2014
3

Haters gonna hate. I always looked down my nose at stuff like this until I actually got my hands on one this spring. I built a whole kitchen with it in an afternoon, no glue-up time required. If you get really crafty with this tool you start finding really tricky ways of hiding the pocket holes so nobody ever sees Read more

Sep 26 2014
9

As a fairly new home owner that is tackling more and more DIY projects, this new Workshop section of Lifehacker is probably now my favorite part of the Kinja family.

Sep 24 2014
3

fair argument, I'm saying start with some basic knowledge of tools before providing instruction to others. You know how difficult this fire pit would be to remove or relocate

Sep 24 2014
3

He doesn't seem to go into any detail about just what "gravel" means for the sublayer. That bottom layer of rock should be what's called three-quarter minus. It's crushed rock of varying sizes from 3/4" and smaller. The varying sizes allows it to be compacted, whereas one uniform size would not compact. Compaction Read more

Sep 23 2014
2

This is a Fire Table I built from scratch. Runs on propane. Puts off some nice heat.

Sep 18 2014
18

One note about trim - if it is nailed at the bottom, it is more than likely in the base plate, and not a stud. So, ymmv. Read more

Sep 18 2014
52

A strong magnet works great to find nails or screws holding the drywall to said studs.

Sep 17 2014
2

I designed and built a bed from pipe (all off the shelf parts). It comes apart into 5 pieces for moving/storage and holds a queen sized mattress. There is about 15 inches of space under the bed for tall storage.

Sep 16 2014
8

Something else to keep in mind is that sometimes you're better off clipping it off and putting a new plug or socket on the ends.

Sep 16 2014
3

That's an OK solution for a temporary repair or relatively low-powered gear, but the solder method will hold up better in the long run and maintain a similar amount of contact area for electrical current, which can make a difference for gear that draws a lot of power (e.g. heaters, hammer drills).

Sep 15 2014
1

I also believe there should be an article or series on painting (walls, projects, staining, lacquering, etc). It's my least favorite thing to do and can kill a clean project if not done well.

Sep 12 2014
1

I've made one of these, the benefits to the UDS are the stability of temperature once you set it, and efficiency with charcoal for long cook times.

Sep 12 2014
3

Would also recommend the Pit Barrel Cooker... It is not a smoker, but it is similar to the Ugly Drum Smoker. Made from a 30 gallon drum, and you hang the meat. I get a nice smoke ring in about 1-1/2 hours at 5300 feet... Read more

Sep 9 2014
1

Much like the cordless vs corded discussion, it really depends on what you're cutting and where you're cutting. A lot of tools can do the same job when equipped with the right blade. As an example: my favorite way of cutting steel plate is with a circular saw with an MK Morse Metal Devil blade. For smaller jobs I Read more

Sep 9 2014
1

The problem with track saws is the price; the Festool TS55 goes for $600-650, the TS75 goes for $700-750. Even the DeWalt DWS520 starts at around $400 (and doesn't even come with a track, that's $100 more)! Read more

Sep 9 2014
1

Worm Saws > Sidewinders. A good wormdrive will last forever and cut through pretty much anything. Read more

Sep 5 2014
5

Personally I think a hand plane and/or cabinet scraper is faster and gives a better finish than a power sander for most work. There is even an entire type of plane devoted to finishing & smoothing and there is very little dust to clean up or breath. It does take some time to learn how to use both correctly and Read more