kitliz
Kit Stansley
kitliz
Sep 25 2014
1

I saw a retailer selling legit parachute-pants recently. There's no escaping the '80's these days. (Technically I see arches more prominently in houses built between the 1930's and 1950's though, and a lot of those are plaster, not drywall... still my first house was full of arches, and when I added an alcove in the Read more

Sep 24 2014
2

There are plenty of things people build that I look at and go, "interesting idea but I totally would have built it differently." If the only people we can ever take anything from are the ones who do it perfectly the first time (or do it exactly the way we would) well... seems like there'd be a lot less inspiration out Read more

Sep 19 2014
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Sounds like a great next-level-skill article... for those who have never soldered, I wouldn't recommend learning in a confined space, that's for sure!

Sep 18 2014
13

I agree, but dammed if I can ever find a pencil when I need one, much less a magnet! ;)

Sep 18 2014
22

I've found stud finders (especially cheap ones) to be inconsistent at best and frustrating as hell... and I think there are plenty of times when someone might want to do a quick job without running to the store to get a stud finder if they don't already have one. This is just good-to-know info for someone who might Read more

Sep 18 2014
25

The US has plenty of houses that aren't stick-framed either, but I hope it's clear enough by the title that we're specifically talking about walls with studs and those who are trying to find them (wherever they may be located) so I don't think it makes sense to write out a long list of exceptions every time I use a Read more

Sep 18 2014
10

Ha. This has never worked for me once... I think some people must have a better ear for it than others!

Sep 15 2014
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That's some serious woodworking right there! I love it. (I tend to balance the "art" of woodworking with getting projects done as quickly as possible, but I'd love to be able to take my time with hand tools like that one day.)

Sep 15 2014
1

Yes! Dovetailing was definitely on my list, and I'll add mortise and tenon to that as well.

Sep 11 2014
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This was a few years ago, but I think it cost around $500 to build out the closet (all the pipe was pre-cut, pre-threaded lengths so there wasn't an extra charge for that.) I think you could do it for more or for less with just wood, depending on what you're looking for. Full-on built-ins would probably be more, Read more

Sep 10 2014
1

Ah... so, I'm not arguing that it's more surfaces to clean or that the grout needs to be sealed well to prevent staining (in the same way natural stone or butcher block need to be sealed) but I don't think there are any properties in grout that make it any more or less susceptible to salmonella than other kitchen Read more

Sep 7 2014
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As with paining any surface, I think you'd really want to prep it right. Chalkboard paint hasn't be formulated/tested to stick to laminate the way an actual countertop paint has, (but it's obviously meant to have good adhesion if you are constantly wiping chalk off of it.) I'd recommend scuff-sanding the laminate and Read more

Sep 4 2014
2

So... don't put it in your house. (Or, as it was used in this case, in the wet-bar of a man-cave in a garage.)

Sep 4 2014
2

I've seen a lot of cabinets that have been painted well, but you definitely need to take care and use the right techniques. (I think the only way to do it is with a sprayer, honestly, but some people swear by using a foam roller to get rid of brush strokes.) I've also seen some that look awesome when done with a chalk Read more

Sep 4 2014
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Ah, do you mean like a coating, or like you want to replace them? Tile counters definitely have their disadvantages (the grout lines and fact that it's not a smooth, seamless surface is on that list) and I don't know how you would coat them to change that. I don't think you could laminate over them either, so it might Read more

Sep 4 2014
1

I tried to give varying options for people who may have an appetite for varying levels of DIY. People may be interested in painting or skim coating existing counters, or, for a little more effort creating something like a tile counter... I did my first kitchen, all counters for under $350 which is cheaper than Read more

Sep 4 2014
2

That's fair (I've found plenty of nail holes patched with toothpaste in walls to go on a hunt for other crappy work.) Then again, how would we really know if we were seeing "good" DIY? Unless you know the previous owners and are able to ask them what they did vs. what they hired someone for. I think in the case of Read more

Sep 4 2014
2

While I totally get your point, DIY isn't always synonymous with "doing a shitty job" or doing something on the cheap to hide a problem. It's easy to make that correlation when you see crappy work done, but it all depends on your skill level and material choices. I've DIYed wood, tile, and concrete counters in all of Read more

Aug 29 2014
1

Well, so the nice thing about the setup in the video is that he used a milk jug frozen full of water... I'm thinking it wouldn't be hard to keep a couple of those in the freezer, you don't have to deal with the melted ice and seems like it might last longer.