Jason Fitzgerald
jasonfitz1
Jason Fitzgerald is a 2:39 marathoner and USATF-certified running coach. He writes for hundreds of thousands of monthly readers at Strength Running, where he helps runners set monster personal bests.
4/2/19
1:10 PM
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95% of your max speed is not a sprint. It’s a controlled sprint at a sub-maximal effort. That’s the difference :)

4/2/19
1:08 PM
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That’s right! Stride-outs, strides, striders, or accelerations are all the name for the same thing: a ~100m acceleration to ~95% maximum speed with full recovery after warming up.

4/26/16
10:49 AM
2

Why yes, yes I did. The next time I tell my wife I’m perfect, I’ll remember this...

3/7/16
4:12 PM
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There’s no single “correct” form, but there are certainly best practices:

3/7/16
3:57 PM
1

Sprinting downhill is rarely a good idea! Your question essentially boils down to “how do I run fast for a longer period of time” which is essentially an issue of endurance. Run more mileage, do a weekly long run, and be very gradual and persistent about those things. More reading: http://strengthrunning.com/2014/03/en

3/7/16
3:54 PM
2

I consider myself a “cautious minimalist.” Think of barefoot running or wearing very minimalist shoes as a training tool - just like a long run, deadlifts, or sprints. They’re very helpful for accomplishing a specific goal (reinforcing proper running form, building foot and lower leg strength) but you shouldn’t wear

3/7/16
3:52 PM
2

Hi Shana. I’d focus on lengthening the time you run and shortening the time you walk. Run easy, don’t try to sprint or “run hard.” Adding another easy day of run-walking can also help.

3/7/16
3:48 PM
1

Sure, that’s possible. I knew I wasn’t cut out for basketball when I topped out at 5'7"! But based on your question, it sounds like for you it’s mostly mental. Get a solid training plan (ahem, ahem, I know a good coach who could help you with that!) and give yourself the time to become a good runner. That might take

3/7/16
3:47 PM
2

I’d look out for the mistake of thinking gear makes you a good runner :) Focus on consistency, internal motivation, and building your mileage/intensity gradually over time.

3/7/16
3:46 PM
1

After the HM, I’d take 4-7 days off and then start a much lower volume ~2.5 week program to help you develop some speed for the 1500m. It’s not an ideal schedule, but you might be able to race really well. Good luck!

3/7/16
3:45 PM
2

I want to challenge you here: you *should* have a lot of variability in your pacing from day to day! That’s just sound training. I have some runners who have a ~3min spread from their fastest workout paces to their slowest recovery runs.

3/7/16
3:41 PM
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If that’s your goal, then I’d cut back your heavy weight lifting days to two per week. Remember, weights should complement your running, not detract from it. It sounds like lifting that much is very fatiguing for you (and that’s normal - 3x heavy lifting per week would crush me!) so it would be wise to do less of it.