edcara
Ed Cara
edcara
Science writer at Gizmodo and pug aficionado elsewhere
Sep 11
4

Oh, and it’s a similar story for mRNA vaxes: Preclinical data seems solid, but none have made it all the way to human approval.

Sep 11
4

It’s an adenovirus-based vax, as is the Oxford one and the Chinese-based one. These types of vaxes have been pretty well-vetted safety wise in people, but only one has made it to approval in humans (a Ebola vax approved by China, iirc)

Sep 10
3

ibell not Ed confirmed. Sorry, yes, it was just a typo, since fixed. Singular woman. 

Sep 9
3

Sorry, that’s just a flat out typo! Meant Tulsa, Oklahoma. Fixed now 

Sep 1
2

Should have made clearer that they were compared to standard masks, so more my fault!. But all’s well that ends well.

Sep 1
21

Yes, that’s on me! They did test a variety of other masks, and found they were generally more effective at blocking aerosols, though not perfect. Have now updated blog to clarify

Aug 28
2

What everyone has said is true, but also have to keep in mind that the many other vaccines in development may be able to better generate immunity via different targets than the ones we’re testing now

Aug 26
1

As one of the people below notes, poor ventilation is bad because in situations where infected people are around for a prolonged time, the virus may be able to linger in air for longer than the six-foot rule would suggest it can. The strong airflow example was in reference to a documented outbreak where people at a Read more

Aug 21
2

Tame was a shorthand for the very complex give-and-take relationship our bodies have with viruses and other microbes, but you’re totally right!

Aug 20
2

Yeah, not a slam dunk either way. And while I do agree that we’ve been doing better against infectious disease over the past century, the possibility that we’ll have more to fear from future pandemics, antibiotic resistance, etc is also very real

Aug 20
13

I mean, I think a lot more people would have died of covid-19 a hundred years ago, when we had limited means of communicating globally, a World War, fewer advances in supportive health care, and generally just less healthy bodies. In New York City this year, the death rate of covid-19 surpassed that of the Spanish Flu. Read more

Aug 19
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I don’t think anyone has specifically tossed out opioids as a possible factor for those diseases. But AGEs (which can be caused by lots of things) have been studied for their role in protein-related disorders like prions and Alz so maybe you’re not too far off... https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/path.2682

Aug 18
2

So I did ask about tolerance, and the study author said antibodies are unlikely to play much of a role there, at least compared to the other established mechanisms in the brain that are also blamed for this.

Aug 5
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Thanks for catching! Fixed now

Aug 5
2

There are obviously limitations to this study and more research should be conducted to confirm this pattern, which I can always be clearer about. That said, I do want to point out that this study *did not* compare different sets of cognitive testing data across time; it compared age groups of people who took the same Read more

Aug 3
53

This is me at 1am last night asking the same question. But I will say that someone accused of faking the death of someone employed by a prominent university—a death supposedly caused by the current pandemic and which strongly implicates the university of negligence—is going to be a newsworthy story.  

Jul 29
1

I sympathize for you and your family. It’s not an easy decision either way!

Jul 21
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All good boys and girls, I’m sure!

Jul 21
4

I do believe that puggles tend to be healthier than pugs and they were cross-bred with that purpose in mind. But the retropug movement is explicitly about trying to return the pug to its earlier physicality, whereas puggles would be considered a designer breed and seem to predate the movement by a few decades (the Read more