allisonrobicelli
Allison Robicelli
allisonrobicelli
Allison Robicelli is The Takeout staff writer, a former professional chef, author of three books, and The People's Hot Pocket Princess. Questions about recipes/need cooking advice? Tweet @Robicellis.
Jan 14
1

They were not! I only take photos for my original recipes. I’m not a real photographer, and it’s definitely not an easy job. 

Jan 13
5

Can’t tell without seeing the recipe, but my guess is because it uses a liquid fat like oil or melted butter. Fats coat the flour proteins, preventing them from linking up and forming long gluten strands. 

Jan 12
1

That’s probably something psychosomatic, which I completely understand as I get that way sometimes, too. Like, know when you’re on the fence if something is still good but you end up eating it anyway, and then you feel sick all day entirely because you’re so worried about getting sick? The mind is a powerful thing.

The Read more

Jan 12
1

Large chunks of fatty meats used to be cooked in those old pots. They’d have developed some seasoning over time.

Jan 12
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After hundreds of uses a cast iron skillet will have so many layers of polymerized fat they’ll pretty much be nonstick and may not require soap. Takes a while to get there, but when you finally do it’s such a special feeling.

Jan 12
1

I like using that method, too, but there’s no way I can give people that advice without some of them blasting their face off. 110% agree with that TSSSHHHH noise being satisfying! 

Jan 12
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The longer you own your pans, the better they get. They’re like beloved members of the family.

Jan 11
7

Nope, iron pots were in use in the Han Dynasty. It’s a damn fun period to read about! Most weeks I can’t even get motivated enough to do my basic 21st century chores, and here these people were nearly 2000 years ago, smelting 24/7 with no complaints.

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Jan 11
5

Your wife is kinda taking a kosher approach about pans, in that if meat has touched it, it’s traif forever. Here’s the deal: if you’ve seared meat it in, there’s a chance that during the cooking process some of the oil polymerized onto the pan. Could be a microscopic amount, but it still happened. If you wash it with Read more

Jan 11
2

You don’t need to do anything to it! Every time you cook with it you’ll be building up more polymer chains, so the seasoning will get better and better over time. Just keep it clean and the pan will last you a lifetime. 

Jan 8
3

Quick hummus, yes. Good hummus, no. Skinning each and every chickpea by hand is tedious as hell, but man is it worth it.